Southwark Playhouse – Aspects of Love

Is there such word as love-hexagon?

Or what one calls a situation where 6 people are interconnected by having feelings and/or attraction towards each other? They say that was the life in the 1930s-1950s France or  Europe in general. Life is a cabaret ladies and gents. Or that is how that period is framed in quite a few movies and musicals.

 

Theatre

Southwark Playhouse Theatre Company was founded in 1993 and since has grown into one of the leading studio theatres in London. The theatre runs several community programmes and has youth, elderly and over 25’s theatre companies with regular performances. Current venue has 2 theatres, the Large seating roughly 200 and the Small seating 100 people.

 

Plot

17-year old Alex Dillingham, enchanted by a 25-year-old actress, Rose Vibert, invites her to his uncle’s villa to spend a week. The lovebirds are interrupted by Alex’s uncle, owner of the villa, George; he came to check on the lovers. He sees Rose wearing his late wife’s dress and is struck by her beauty, but leaves the villa and the couple to enjoy the time together. Soon, Rose leaves Alex to go back to acting and Alex goes to the army. When he returns 2 years later and goes to see his uncle, discovers Rose living with George, he accuses Rose for going after George’s money, but then they make love. Next morning, Rose urges Alex to leave before George arrives and explains that she once loved Alex, but now her heart belongs to George. Alex is enraged and they get into a fight; he shoots a gun and Rose is injured in her arm. George arrives and the two men have a long discussion who should Rose stay with. George steps aside, leaving the young couple, as he tries to find comfort with his long-time friend and lover Giulietta, an Intalian sculptor. Rose chooses George over Alex and follows George to Venice, where she meets with Giulietta and the two find common ground. George loses his fortune and Rose asks him to marry her. The two get married and Giulietta claims best man’s rights by kissing Rose on the lips. Second act opens with a scene in Paris 12 years later, where Rose is a famous actress and lives with George in the same villa where Alex took her the first time. They have a 12-year old daughter, Jenny. Alex goes to see Rose on-stage and the latter invites him to the villa. George is happy to see Alex after so many years and asks him to stay. Alex stays with Rose, George and Jenny for a couple of years and during this time Jenny starts to have feelings for him. At her 15th birthday, Jenny tells Rose and then Alex about her feelings. Alex tries to convince her that they are just cousins and these feelings are not to be taken seriously, but he also admits to Rose that he has developed some feelings towards Jenny as well. George learns about it and has a heart attack. At George’s funeral Giulietta makes a speech and Alex gets a chance to meet Giulietta for the first time. The two start flirting and end up sharing bed, while Jenny is spying on them. Alex decides to leave with Giulietta and goes to Jenny to say goodbye. Jenny insists on her feelings towards him, but finds herself helpless as Alex leaves. Giulietta and Alex go to the train station and she asks Alex what will happen after Jenny reaches the legal age, Alex replies by a song that “Love changes everything”.

 

Production

Aspects of Love, the musical, is based on a book by David Garnett, the music was created by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics written by Don Black and Charles Hart. Jonathan O’Boyle’s revival premiered at Hope Mill Theatre’s in July 2018 and ran for 5 weeks before transferring to Southwark Playhouse.

Director:        Jonathan O’Boyle

Producer:       Aria Entertainment, Hope Mill Theatre, Jim Kierstead

Casting:         Jane Deitch

07711 856789
2 High Street, Wilden, Bedford, MK44 2PB

 

Ticket

Bought my ticket from Southwark Playhouse website. £27.5 for a side seat in the stalls. The theatre is quite small and there are no bad seats, except for side corners.

 

Running time is 2 hours 20 minutes.

 

The Theatre Rat

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